Is football hooliganism still an expression of working class discontent?.
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Is football hooliganism still an expression of working class discontent?.

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Published by LCP in London .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesBA thesis Graphic and Media Design 2000
ContributionsLondon College of Printing.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18542738M

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  This book provides a highly readable introduction to the phenomenon of football hooliganism, ideal for students taking courses around this subject as well as those having a professional interest in the subject, such as the police and those responsible for stadium safety and management. For anybody else wanting to learn more about one of society's most intractable problems, this book is the.   Football hooliganism periodically generates widespread political and public anxiety. In spite of the efforts made and resources invested over the past decades, football hooliganism is still perceived by politicians, policymakers and media as a disturbing social problem.   In this article a sociological diagnosis of football hooliganism as a world phenomenon is given. The author uses mainly English (newspaper) data about football violence (in and outside England) as an empirical base to explore how hooliganism can be theorised and understood. These data can usefully serve as a rough indication of the worldwide incidence of football hooliganism in the Cited by:   An additional limitation is the use of the West Ham television documentary. Obviously a media source can present a false personification of hooliganism and is not practical enough to initiate a legitimate thesis. Their argument focuses on the lower working-class and consequently West Ham are the most famous working-class club around.

Books shelved as football-hooligan: The Crew by Dougie Brimson, Among the Thugs by Bill Buford, Top Dog by Dougie Brimson, Skagboys by Irvine Welsh, and. It is easy to become a football hooligan only if the situations are perfect i.e. you are mentally down, you want to be entertained- to be noticed, to be involved in risk, you want loyalties, you want to act cool or you deeply love your football club (which is the least chance for a person to become a hooligan).   Football is no longer a cost-effective pursuit of the working class. It is now reserved only for those deemed responsible – and wealthy — enough to attend. Despite such attempts to gentrify the support base in English football, organised supporter campaigns continue to emphasise issues of class . Football is the most popular sport all over the world but this beautiful game has a dark side: corruption, homophobia, violence, and racism. The goal of this paper is to analyze the relationship.

  Street or stadium violence by England fans could wreck their team's hopes of winning Euro Lyndsey Turner kicks around ways of exploring football hooliganism in the : Lyndsey Turner. Football Hooliganism Steve Frosdick, Peter Marsh This book provides a highly readable introduction to the phenomenon of football hooliganism, ideal for students taking courses around this subject as well as those having a professional interest in the subject, such as the police and those responsible for stadium safety and management.   Although football will always remain a loved, venerated sport, mental fans have blemished the beautiful game with misbehaviour and violence. In the past few decades, hooliganism has drastically shifted from a cultural issue to a social one; bringing apprehension to casual fans and causing injury and even death. The term football hooligan has been created by the media to identify trouble makers during football matches. In the mids the media was flexible and indeterminate in giving the hooligan label to different incidents. Football hooliganism is seen by most to mean violence or disorder involving football fans (Clarke, ).